Books

The Death of the Novel and Other Stories

[PDF] Read ´ The Death of the Novel and Other Stories : by Ronald Sukenick - The Death of the Novel and Other Stories, The Death of the Novel and Other Stories Originally published in The Death of the Novel and Other Stories remains among the most memorable creations of an unforgettable age Irrepressibly experimental in both content and form these ant

  • Title: The Death of the Novel and Other Stories
  • Author: Ronald Sukenick
  • ISBN: 9781573661058
  • Page: 184
  • Format: Paperback

[PDF] Read ´ The Death of the Novel and Other Stories : by Ronald Sukenick, The Death of the Novel and Other Stories, Ronald Sukenick, The Death of the Novel and Other Stories Originally published in The Death of the Novel and Other Stories remains among the most memorable creations of an unforgettable age Irrepressibly experimental in both content and form these anti fictions set out to rescue experience from its containment within artistic convention and bourgeois morality Equal parts high modernist aesthete and borscht [PDF] Read ´ The Death of the Novel and Other Stories : by Ronald Sukenick - The Death of the Novel and Other Stories, The Death of the Novel and Other Stories Originally published in The Death of the Novel and Other Stories remains among the most memorable creations of an unforgettable age Irrepressibly experimental in both content and form these ant

  • [PDF] Read ´ The Death of the Novel and Other Stories : by Ronald Sukenick
    184Ronald Sukenick
The Death of the Novel and Other Stories

About "Ronald Sukenick"

  1. Ronald Sukenick

    Ronald Sukenick was an American writer and literary theorist.Sukenick studied at Cornell University, and wrote his doctoral thesis on Wallace Stevens, at Brandeis University.After Roland Barthes announced the death of the author , Sukenick carried the metaphor even further in the death of the novel He drew up a list of what is missing reality doesn t exist, nor time or personality He was widely recognized as a controversial writer who, frequently humorously, questioned and rejected the conventions of traditional fiction writing In novels, short stories, literary criticism and history, he often used himself, family members or friends as characters, sometimes quoting them in tape recorded conversations He did stints as writer in residence at Cornell University, the University of California, Irvine, and Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel But his books were never best sellers Sukenick once commented that he had only forty fans, but they re all fanatics He referred to his career as a university professor as his day job He taught at Brandeis University, Hofstra University, City College of the City University of New York, Sarah Lawrence College, Cornell University, the State University of New York Buffalo , and l Universit Paul Val ry, Montpellier, France His most prolonged teaching career was at the University of Colorado, Boulder, where he was professor of English from 1975 1999.He was actively committed to publishing and promoting the writing of other unconventional writers He was founder and publisher of American Book Review, and a founder of The Fiction Collective now Fiction Collective Two Sukenick was chairman of the Coordinating Council of Little magazines, and on the executive council of the Modern Language Association and the National Book Critics Circle.

275 Comments

  1. True to the actually pretty amusing title, Roland Sukenick s stories that toy with the exhausted edges of literature and form The title track, really a novella, with its structural and temporal dislocations, interior notes on construction and sense of improvisation and chance, is really the showpiece here Everything else in here feels like a pencil test or warm up version by comparison The couple that shoot for verite by being dictated or incidentally recorded onto tape in the instant of their c [...]


  2. Hope to return to this later stalled only since my copy is enshrined in a reference library halfway across the country, so makes reading somewhat challenging Quite interesting so far, although Sukenick seems pretty intent on showing himself as a sexist womaniser in almost every story either biofictionally or notherwise.


  3. Ronald Sukenick writes There s one of the ideas we have to get rid of the Great Work That s one of the ways we have of strangling ourselves in our culture We ve got enough Great Works Once a work becomes Great forget it What we need is not Great Works but playful ones in whose sense of creative joy everyone can join Play, after all, is the source of the learning instinct, that has been proved by indispensable scientific experiments And what characterizes play Freedom, spontaneity, pleasure This [...]


  4. A collection of stories written in the 1960s that range from kind of banal to very clever, sometimes aided and sometimes marred by a somewhat experimental approach Worth reading in its own right, but interesting as a snapshot of what adventurous American literature was up to in that era.




Leave a Comment