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British Comics: A Cultural History

British Comics: A Cultural History Best Download || [JamesChapman] - British Comics: A Cultural History, British Comics A Cultural History In this entertaining cultural history of British comic papers and magazines James Chapman shows how comics were transformed in the early twentieth century from adult amusement to imaginative reading

  • Title: British Comics: A Cultural History
  • Author: JamesChapman
  • ISBN: 9781861898555
  • Page: 459
  • Format: Hardcover

British Comics: A Cultural History Best Download || [JamesChapman], British Comics: A Cultural History, JamesChapman, British Comics A Cultural History In this entertaining cultural history of British comic papers and magazines James Chapman shows how comics were transformed in the early twentieth century from adult amusement to imaginative reading matter for children Beginning with the first British comic Ally Sloper known as A Selection Side splitting Sentimental and Serious for the Benefit of Old Boys British Comics: A Cultural History Best Download || [JamesChapman] - British Comics: A Cultural History, British Comics A Cultural History In this entertaining cultural history of British comic papers and magazines James Chapman shows how comics were transformed in the early twentieth century from adult amusement to imaginative reading

  • British Comics: A Cultural History Best Download || [JamesChapman]
    459 JamesChapman
British Comics: A Cultural History

About "JamesChapman"

  1. JamesChapman

    There is than one author with this nameJames Chapman is Professor of Film Studies at the University of Leicester He has written several books on the history of British popular culture, including work on cinema, television and comics.He attended Wales High School during the 1980s He took his BA History and MA Film Studies at the University of East Anglia and then undertook his doctoral research at Lancaster University, completing his thesis on the role of official film propaganda in Britain during the Second World War.In 1996 he joined The Open University where he taught a broad range of undergraduate and postgraduate courses and was principal contributing author to the university s first dedicated course on Film and Television History He joined the University of Leicester as its founding Professor of Film Studies in 2005.Chapman s research focuses on British popular culture, especially cinema and television in their historical contexts He has written or edited ten books, including two which he has co authored with Professor Nicholas J Cull His work draws upon the ideas of the film theorist Gilles Deleuze and applies them to understanding the role and nature of popular film and television His books include studies of the science fiction television series Doctor Who and the James Bond films SFX magazine described his book Licence To Thrill as thoughtful, intelligent, ludicrous and a bit snobby bit like Bond really.He is a Council member of the International Association for Media and History IAMHIST and is editor of the Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television.Chapman has also published articles in the following journals Screen, Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, Journal of Popular British Cinema, Visual Culture in Britain, Journal of Contemporary History, Contemporary British History, Media History and European Journal of Cultural Studies.

967 Comments

  1. This is a superb history of the British popular comic from Ally Sloper in the 1880s through to Judge Dredd and beyond.There is a coherent history to British popular culture with patterns repeating themselves in other genres than comics see our review of McKay s history of Hammer Horror at review show An individual British style and creativity certainly exists but economic conditions depression, war, imperial drawdown, the recession of the 1970s and American competition make the story a sad one.T [...]


  2. Truly horrid, and self consciously pompous and academic It s very well researched and detailed, but it shows no understanding of why some people create comics, or why other people might want to read them, or how why those two groups of people might interact.I learnt the names and dates of production of some comics, but little else I cared about.


  3. A scholarly look at the history of British comics than recent books I have read on their American counterparts, this book is littered with references, but is no less readable for it Compared to the huge industry on the other side of the Atlantic, the British comics industry appears tiny, but that allows for concentration on the individual sections Each chapter tells the story of a particular type of comic adult, underground, SF, girls, humour, war, etc which, almost coincidentally, seems to co [...]


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